Girl in Padaung village

We headed up into the hills in our van, hoping to come across remote Padaung villages. The dirt track, however, proved too much for the poor vehicle, and we couldn’t proceed much further. There was a road construction crew that we had passed a few minutes earlier and we were able to negotiate the usage of one of their “tractors” that is normally used to haul raw materials.

We jumped into the back of the tractor, and upward and onward we went into the hills, following dirt tracks that we hoped would reach some interesting villages. Even the tractor found the going tough, and we had had to dismount several times to give the thing a fighting chance to negotiate through the rough terrain. Shake, rattle, and roll; sitting on solid metal was pretty uncomfortable!

After a while we were soon at our target, the tractor chugging its way into the centre of a Padaung village. The villagers informed us that we were the first foreigners they had seen since the British left Burma in 1948. I took that with a pinch of salt though. But the journey was worth it, as the village still practised many traditional techniques. This is a photo of a young schoolgirl from the village.

A young girl in a fairly remote Padaung village in Kayah State, Myanmar (Burma). Photo taken in December 2014.

However, we were filled with dread of the return journey in that tractor.

But the pain of the return trip in the tractor was short lived as we, instead, soon ditched the tractor and hiked through the hills heading in a direction that we thought would lead us to a road. The hike was memorable as it enabled us to take in the wonderful scenery and interact more sociably with the people we met along the way. A good day!

The Mursi

The Mursi are one of the many tribes in the Omo Valley in southern Ethiopia. They have an aggressive reputation and keep large herds of cattle, but these days increasingly rely on tourists to obtain money by going that extra mile to decorate themselves. The lip-plates are real, but I am sceptical that the other decorations reflect genuine Mursi culture. Certainly not your every-day-wear but probably used often for special occasions.

Himba boy

A cold night meant a cold start to the day in Namibia, even here right up against the Angolan border. Taking advantage of the cold before the heat arrived, I began exploring the rather small Himba village. Much there was to see with the inhabitants shaking off the night. A particular highlight was when I made eye contact with this boy wrapped in a blanket.

Dark flower

The flowers in my garden provide a sweeping swathe of bright colours when the sun comes out. Whilst closely admiring one of my yellow dahlias, I noticed that, with the bright yellows, it was easy to overlook the delicate textures of the flower. Hoping that a black-and-white treatment would bring out the details, I present the result here. Enjoy!