Dead trees of Deadvlei

A unique view of the dead, desiccated trees of Deadvlei in Namibia which I photographed in August 2015. This photo won a Photoburst Travel Photo of the Day.

“Deadvlei” from the English word “dead” and the Afrikaans word “vlei” for marsh. It was once an area fed by the Tsauchab River where trees and other plants flourished. Perhaps 600-700 years ago, maybe 900 years ago, the changing climate and encroaching sand dunes conspired to cut-off the water supply, killing-off the trees and most of the plants.

Today, visitors are greeted by an eerie but spectacular sight. Illuminated by the brilliant blue skies, a white clay pan is surrounded by rust-coloured sand dunes which are reputed to be some of the highest in the world at over 1,312 feet (400 metres). And the trees; dead, desiccated, and scorched black by the sun. Truly a forest of the dead.

The Mursi

The Mursi are one of the many tribes in the Omo Valley in southern Ethiopia. They have an aggressive reputation and keep large herds of cattle, but these days increasingly rely on tourists to obtain money by going that extra mile to decorate themselves. The lip-plates are real, but I am sceptical that the other decorations reflect genuine Mursi culture. Certainly not your every-day-wear but probably used often for special occasions.

Dark flower

The flowers in my garden provide a sweeping swathe of bright colours when the sun comes out. Whilst closely admiring one of my yellow dahlias, I noticed that, with the bright yellows, it was easy to overlook the delicate textures of the flower. Hoping that a black-and-white treatment would bring out the details, I present the result here. Enjoy!